The Work

 

"I STARTED THIS AS A PERSONAL JOURNEY BECAUSE I WANTED TO BECOME MORE COMFORTABLE WITH DEATH ITSELF AND IT’S SOMETHING WE ALL SHY AWAY FROM."

 

              Minutes and Chapel of Rest

Who we are? Where we are going? And why? 
In our culture we do not like to discuss issues relating to death or even mention it even though the one thing that we all have in common is that one-day we will all die. As humans we are fearful of death and do not want to face it, in juxtaposition to this, we are also fascinated with death and like Freud agrees; we all have an ‘unconscious desire to die.’ This is a personal project and journey investigating what happens after we die? These series are exploring the journey of the body through cremations and the uncanny spaces of the chapels of rest. This project will bring us all closer and together and open up the taboo surrounding death with my photography, and push the viewer into spaces where they wouldn’t ideally choose to be.

 

One last view

These beautiful locations have a hidden history of death. These locations are notorious suicide spots where people have “chosen” to die. The people who have committed suicide are completely absent. The viewer is present and is put in the shoes of the suicidal: looking at the last landscape seen before death.

Move to the edge and share in their final earthly view.

 

Lost piers

This work looks into the ever-changing landscape and documents that specific time and space. It looks into the loss and death of the landscape with a very objective viewpoint making the photographer absent. With the landscape ever changing through time you begin to question the photographs. You almost become in a dream like state.

Photographing past historic seaside leisure pursuits that in there ‘hey day’ would have attracted large audiences. To once again bring these same scenes in to the public domain as a sense of loss to our British heritage.

 

Secret bunker

A secret exhibition in a World War II bunker using found images and some images of my ancestors. Viewers are welcome to leave their personal memories of the war and to contribute to the hanging leaving their mark on this public exhibition.